WebsiteBannerGlasses June2020

 

by Marieke Baan

Although not every professional astrophysicist is so poorly informed about the night sky, this is not a unique example. Education and Public Outreach officers use the celestial phenomena that are visible to the naked eye to enthuse people about stargazing and astronomy. They want to share their passion for the wonders of the universe with the general public and - especially - kids. One can regard this as entry-level astronomy.

Since young children are sponges for information, the step to the next level (the solar system, deep space and exotic objects like black holes) is easy to make. We all benefit: the children whose insatiable hunger for knowledge is satisfied; society as a whole, because in a modern, digital society it is important that people understand how science works, and learn to discriminate between real and pseudo science; and for science itself: as we all know, astronomy is an important science attractor.

Shouldn't every professional astronomer look up so now and then, and be aware of the power of the phases of the moon, the visibility and conjunctions of the planets, the wonders of the northern lights? Yes, they should, they must and they can.

I was writing this blogpost between phone calls with TV crews wanting to report live from the observatory of the University of Amsterdam about the 20 March partial eclipse. Someone at the institute asked me: "Why all this fuss about tomorrow's solar eclipse anyway? Is this astronomy?" So especially for her: here are some upcoming 2015 night sky phenomena to start communicating, whether on Twitter, Facebook, at a birthday party or to your children’s school class.

 

18 July: Moon, Venus and Jupiter at the evening sky

12 August: maximum of the Perseid meteor shower

22 August: conjunction of the Moon and Saturn

13 September: partial solar eclipse, visible in South Africa and Antarctica

28 September: total eclipse of the Moon in Europe, Africa, North- and South America

9 October: Moon, Venus, Mars and Jupiter at the morning sky

###

Marieke Baan is a Head of Communication Netherlands Research School for Astronomy (NOVA) www.astronomie.nl

@mariekebaan

 

 

Member Reports

View All
Jul 12

Comet NEOWISE

Friday 10 July 2020, Il got to our observation field at 22;30 CET with in mind the info that according...

Read More...
Jul 07

The biggest Astro adventure of the Year will started

The Glitter Festival 2020 Astronomy festival of the State of Goias has started with a Skyrunners theme. This year we...

Read More...
Jul 05

Annular Solar Eclipse of June 21, 2020 at the MMAO Summary

As the Ailangs school is not yet in session, and the boarding students not yet returned to campus due to...

Read More...
Jul 04

Solar Eclipse 2020 real photograph of 98% coverage on 21st June from Kurukshetra, India

Greetings from Team SciComm! It is our immense pleasure to share with you the live experience as well as the...

Read More...
Jul 03

QUARANTINE ASTRONOMY - JULY 2020 - BOLIVIA

Hello Astronomers! For sure this period of quarantine was challenging for everyone. Furthermore a positive mind is more than important!...

Read More...
Jun 24

Solar Observation

Our nearest star,the Sun is a huge globe of hot gas.This charged gas moves and generates powerful magnetic field.The sun's...

Read More...
Jun 23

Using YouTube to maintain outreach activities during Covid-19

I Normally I would be busy with me Mobile Planetarium, but since March I have had no work at all....

Read More...
Jun 23

Annular Solar eclipse of June 21,2020

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon moves between the Sun and the Earth.There are three types of solar eclipses...

Read More...
Jun 20

African Astronomical Society Eclipse Resources

The African Astronomical Society is coordinating a pan-African public campaign for the 21 June solar eclipse in collaboration with outreach...

Read More...

Current Projects & Events

Social Media Updates